Monday, April 8, 2013

Adolf Hitler Swastika under Nazis was similar to SS Division, the SA, the NSV, the Todt organization, etc, and the VW logo (the letters "V" and "W" joined for "Volkswagen")


Germany did not adopt the swastika, technically speaking, because they did not call the symbol a "swastika." They called it a "Hakenkreuz" which means "hooked cross." It was a type of cross and Hitler used it to represent crossed S-letters for his socialism under his National Socialist German Workers Party (see the book "Pledge of Allegiance + Swastika Secrets" by Ian Tinny and the historian Dr. Rex Curry). Although an ancient symbol, it was altered and used as alphabetical symbolism similar to that of the SS Division, the SA, the NSV, the Todt organization, etc, and the VW logo (the letters "V" and "W" joined for "Volkswagen"). Most people do not know that because they only think of Hitler's group as "Nazis," and they do not know the etymology of the word "Nazi," and they do not realize that Hitler's group never called themselves Nazis (and never called the symbol a swastika), but always used the term "socialist" as a self-description. The term "swastika" is used by people who want to distance Hitler's symbol from the Christian cross, by instead slandering a different symbol from a foreign background: the swastika.

http://www.amazon.com/Pledge-Allegiance-Swastika-Secrets-Francis/dp/148121618X/ref=la_B00B0VE6DU_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365437167&sr=1-1

Hitler adopted the symbol because it had already been associated with socialism in the first ruble paper currency under the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and by socialists in the USA, such as Edward Bellamy and the Theosophical Society. Hitler had supported the Bavarian Soviet Republic (aka Munich Soviet Republic). Later, Hitler and his German socialists would become allies with Stalin and Soviet socialists in a plan to divide up Europe, invading Poland together and spreading WWII, and the socialist Wholecaust (of which the Holocaust was a part) the largest slaughter of humanity in history.